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Harpenden man talks on TV about new cancer treatment

PUBLISHED: 13:57 02 July 2019 | UPDATED: 13:57 02 July 2019

Stephen Scrowcroft, head of business development for Lymphoma Action, speaking about a brand new cancer treatment on BBC news. Picture: Lymphoma Action

Stephen Scrowcroft, head of business development for Lymphoma Action, speaking about a brand new cancer treatment on BBC news. Picture: Lymphoma Action

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A Harpenden man made a television appearance to speak about a brand new cancer treatment.

Stephen Scowcroft, 45, was interviewed BBC's morning news on Friday June, 21

The head of business development for charity Lymphoma Action was explaining a new treatment with the potential to transform the prognosis for some people with difficult-to-treat lymphoma.

Lymphoma is the most common cancer in teenagers and young adults.

Symptoms include a lump in the neck, armpit or groin, feeling worn-out for no reason, unexplained weight loss, excessive sweating at night and constant itching for no reason. Stephen described the treatment as "a big step change in the treatment of blood cancer."

CAR T-cell therapy is a complex treatment that can help some people with fast-growing forms of lymphoma that do not respond to first-line options such as chemotherapy. T cells (T lymphocytes) are cells of your immune system.

They help the body fight infections and disease, but sometimes abnormal cells can't be detected by the immune system and build up into cancer. In CAR T-cell therapy, T cells are collected and genetically modified to recognise and kill lymphoma cells.

Other changes made during the process help the CAR T-cells to survive and multiply once they are put back into your body in a process similar to a blood transfusion.

Stephen said: ""We only had 30 minutes notice to prepare for the BBC interview and we couldn't make it to the studio in that time, so had to get a remote link set up. In the end we did the interview over FaceTime, which was a bit strange because I couldn't see the studio or interviewers - only hear them.

"I have been interviewed before but this was my first time on national TV and so I was a bit nervous, especially as it was live! There was lots of excitement in the office.

"Overall it went well and of course I would do it again as it was a great opportunity to talk about lymphoma on national TV - that's what Lymphoma Action are here for, to raise awareness so that no one has to face lymphoma alone."

For more information visit www.lymphoma-action.org.uk

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